LET THIS IMAGINATIVE SCRIPT,
FULL OF ARTISTRY AND MAGIC
RE-AWAKEN YOUR SENSES!

For a great traditional pantomime, but a refreshing break from the normal format, this cracking new version of Sleeping Beauty makes a great choice. 

An extra large portion of comedy and some very original twists and turns along the way make for a novel and artistic production.  The storyline is cleverly managed and the common imbalance between Act I and Act II content has finally been resolved! 

Nurse Dottie Dettol, the puddle-brained Muddles and two hapless heralds,  Fetch and Carrie, ensure the laughs come thick and fast, especially when  they meet head-to-head in a hilarious schoolroom scene. 

Whilst there are plenty of opportunities and suggestions for the more ambitious, it can be staged effectively with a minimum of scenery.  There are also more roles for females than the norm.

“...Sleeping Beauty was a triumph. With an up-to-date script from Alan Frayn a scintillating show has evolved in this fun-filled, scrumptious slice of panto magic!”  (Cornish Guardian)

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EXCERPT FROM SCRIPT

10 main principal characters
4 young "Rainbow Fairy" roles
Plenty of involvement for Chorus and Dancers

2 or 3 main full-stage sets
plus front of Tabs or front cloth scenes

FULL CAST & SCENERY DETAILS

AMATEUR STAGE MAGAZINE WROTE ...

"...It would be unfair to dedicate a disproportionate amount of space to one publisher and writer ... [following a long review of Robinson Crusoe & the Pirates in the same issue] ... and yet, by the same token, I cannot let this second "hot off the press" adaptation of one of pantomime's most difficult subjects pass without some introduction. 

It is a traditional story which demands a totally imbalanced cast (as compared to any other pantomime).  Because the story starts at the birth of the Princess and no less than 18 years pass in the first six scenes, we don't meet the Principal Girl until Act I Scene 5 and, inevitably, by the same token, we only meet the Principal Boy a scene later, making both of these "leading" (principal) roles much smaller than usual.  On the other hand Frayn has realised that such a constraining original story makes it possible to provide much meatier roles for the character actors and, in his version more principal roles for women than for men.

Once again he provides copious production notes in his five-page preface.

One thing impressed me more than almost anything else - he has truly beaten the curse of the common imbalance between Act I and Act II - read the introduction to see what I mean."